Question: Can All Pills Be Crushed Or Divided?

What happens if you cut extended release pill in half?

Time-release, delayed-release and extended-release medication, often indicated by an “XR” next to the name, should never be crushed or broken either.

“When you cut a long-acting pill, you can end up making the dose come out much higher and faster, which can be dangerous,” explains Dr..

How do you break a small pill in half?

Press the tablet with your fingers evenly on each side of the score mark until the pill splits in half. Sometimes this will take a decent amount of pressure. Just make sure that you’re using the tips of your fingers to apply even, steady pressure and it will result in a clean break.

Which pills can be split?

Drugs that can be usually be split include Lipitor (atorvastatin), Zocor (simvastatin), Crestor (rosuvastatin), Norvasc (amlodipine), Zestril (lisinopril), Accupril (quinapril), Glucophage (metformin), Synthroid (levothyroxine), Zyprexa (olanzapine), Celexa (citalopram), Paxil (paroxetine), Zoloft (sertraline), …

Can all pills be divided?

In general, most pills for blood pressure, cholesterol, and depression are good candidates to split. Don’t split your pills all at once, however, since moisture and heat may affect half-pills differently than whole pills. It is also important to divide the pill correctly into two even halves to ensure equal doses.

Can you split a pill that is not scored?

Many pills that can be safely split have a “score”, a line down the middle of the pill, that allows for easier splitting. However, be aware that not all tablets that are scored are safe to split in half, so ask your pharmacist first. On the other hand, some tablets that are not scored can be safely cut in half.

When Should tablets not be crushed?

Some medicines should not be crushed because this will alter the absorption or stability of the medicine or it may cause a local irritant effect or unacceptable taste. Sometimes the exposure of powder from crushing medicines may cause occupational health and safety risks to staff.